IMPORTANCE OF PEDIGREE 2


Vote

Hi folks, how often do we hear the ignorants babbel about they don’t breed by peds, they breed on performance. Now,usually this “breeders” are or to lazy to study or simply lack the crude intelligence to understand the fact that factual knowledge of the individuals involved = background is crucial in breeding a consistent performing line of dogs OUT OF PERFORMING dogs. Just look at for example Russia where most,not all,breeders breed solely best to best without any regard to simple laws of nature and therefore most, not all but most of their by the way very good dogs never produce anything but garbage.Here an excerpt of something I posted long ago, by L.C.Brackett, is touching on this very important topic. Let’s start here and I will follow this up in my next posts with some more relevant material.

Importance in Selection of Bitches

Having decided upon the breeding program as has been briefly outlined, my next step, of course, was to find and obtain the necessary bitches with which to implement it. This is not an easy task at any time, or in any breed. Owners of females of breeding age who have proven themselves, or because of type and bloodlines give promise of being worthy producers, are loathe to part with them. When one adds the stipulation that they must be daughters of certain studs, their procurement becomes increasingly difficult. Suffice it to say here, with no other explanation than that it took me about two years to find and Hi folks, how often do we hear the ignorants babbel about they don’t breed by peds, they breed on performance. Now,usually this “breeders” are or to lazy to study or simply lack the crude intelligence to understand the fact that factual knowledge of the individuals involved = background is crucial in breeding a consistent performing line of dogs OUT OF PERFORMING dogs. Just look at for example Russia where most,not all,breeders breed solely best to best without any regard to simple laws of nature and therefore most, not all but most of their by the way very good dogs never produce anything but garbage.Here an excerpt of something I posted long ago, by L.C.Brackett, is touching on this very important topic. Let’s start here and I will follow this up in my next posts with some more relevant material. A.K. obtain them, I DID get a daughter of each of the above three studs. Moreover, in most respects they evidenced the traits for which their sires were notable, and for which I had chosen them to found a strain. With only the mention of my foundation BITCHES given above, I am sure I have not sufficiently stressed their importance. It is a much-used aphorism that no stable is better than its mares, and no kennel better than its bitches. That, of course, is true. The most valuable acquisition a would-be dog breeder can make is that of a good bitch or bitches. Without one or more of these, the tasks of breeding superior specimens in any breed is a long, if not indeed a hopeless, one. It is better, surely, if the bitch herself possesses all the attributes of a show specimen, but of great importance also is her genetic background. It is in her bloodlines, as delineated by her pedigree, that her potential worth can best be judged. Perhaps some elaboration and explanation of that statement should be made, especially as there are those who believe that a top bitch, regardless of what may be behind her in blood-lines, will as likely produce good ones as will another who, though less perfect herself, has a family of good ones behind her. Every experienced dog breeder knows, and it was pointed out in an earlier installment, that sometimes a superior specimen will come from a quite nondescript and hit-or-miss mating. Such a one is an accident or “happenstance”. To claim that a bitch is more likely to reproduce in her own image than that of any one of her litter mates, for instance, is to demonstrate an ignorance of the laws of heredity. Which one or ones, if any, in the litter might carry the genes for the characteristics she alone manifests can be determined only by testing them as breeders.
Here as an illustration is just one example of many observed during my experimental dog breeding days. In a litter of eight there appeared only one who was white. Structurally she was the best of the lot and quite a superior specimen. Bred a total of seven times during her lifetime, she herself never produced a white, nor did any appear in succeeding generations, at least not up to the fourth, when I lost track of them. She either did not carry the genes for white, or the genes for pigment, which she carried, were dominant. On the other hand, several of her sisters did whelp whites. Bitch’s Background of Utmost importance While one of the tenets of all animal breeding is selectivity, this does not mean that a superior bitch, with nothing behind her in sufficient strength to dominate, can be expected to produce as well as another who, although somewhat less perfect in her own structure, has a family tree inbred or line bred upon superior quality.

The sometimes heard statement that “Like produces like” is far from being a dependable truism, BOTH are of importance, the over-all quality and type of the bitch, as well as her family tree, but of the two the latter will be found to have the more influence both for good and for bad. The first article in this series explained why this MUST be true. It is my desire to get away from the subject of my personal operations, in the matter of building a strain, as quickly as possible. Supplying a record of all, or of even a few, of the inter-related matings would be, I fear, not only somewhat confusing, unless pedigrees were given for study, but would also result in book-length articles unsuitable for a magazine, and particularly for one read by fanciers of all breeds. However, in order to explain the “how,” it seems necessary to continue with that subject to a somewhat greater length. Having obtained the three foundation bitches, each related to the others through their sires, and with one having both Pfeffer and Arras close up in her pedigree, I was ready to begin breeding operations, ready, I thought and hoped, to start a breeding program from which would eventuate a noteworthy strain of dogs.

Choosing the Males If it has not already been noted by my readers, I should call attention here to the fact that, since my start was made with bitches sired by three closely related males, I was able to dispense with some years of preliminary matings. Had three unrelated sires been chosen, it would have taken several generations of breeding before I could have had in my kennel bitches so closely related in blood as to make inbreeding and line breeding possible. With two of the foundation males having the same sire (plus other related blood), and the third a close-up descendent of the great German Sieger, U.s. Ch. Utz v. Haus-Schutting. as were the others, I was actually STARTING with line bred animals. (Had either Odin, or his half-brother Pfeffer, been a bitch, and one bred to the other, that would have been inbreeding.) Therefore one can see how quickly I was “cooking with gas” or, perhaps stated mores understandably, doing planned line breeding, when I bred either an Odin daughter to Pfeffer, or the reverse—and I immediately did both. The results to be anticipated, as described in my first installment explaining what can be expected from inbreeding and line breeding, were quickly brought forth and plainly visible. It took only a few generations until the type I had wanted to establish and “set” was obtained. While none of the three males upon which I started the strain was perfect in all characteristics (no dog as yet has ever been), it should be pointed out that not only were they quite superior specimens in themselves but each compensated the other in one or more respects. This being true, when some unwanted or undesirable trait showed up, compensation could usually be found in one of the others. Foundation Blood Intensifies P.S. Even with regard to let’s say four generations of game proven but SCATTER bred dogs the results will be a very low percentage of prepotent dogs, if any. By the early 1950’s”, Lloyd C.

Brackett had become a legend in his own time. In part because of his candor when addressing problems related to the breeding of canines. All of his methods and ideas were not new but his ideas about how to use it attracted attention. Brackett believed in pedigree analysis, litter evaluation, the use of line and inbreeding and a record system that was easy to use. While Brackett is best known for his emphasis on the use of line breeding he was not afraid to inbreed if the situation dictated it. Brackett understood the value of using quality dogs that were related to each other. This approach allowed him to concentrate the genes needed to produce desired traits. His techniques for reducing error and improving quality focused on the careful selection of breeding partners.


Leave a comment

2 thoughts on “IMPORTANCE OF PEDIGREE